Paintings

Description of the painting Rene Magritte “Lovers” (Lovers)


The painting was created in 1928.

The viewer knows two options for this picture. On one canvas in front of us, a man and a woman merged in a long kiss. Their heads are wrapped in white fabric.

On another option, they are looking directly at us. This picture is incredibly symbolic. It contains an incredibly deep meaning. Some critics are sure that the plot can be interpreted as the inability of people to reveal the true essence of relationships even with very close people.

The reason for creating this picture was the trauma experienced by the artist in childhood (the death of her mother, who decided to jump into the river). The head of the found body was wrapped in cloth. The woman who was beautiful during her life did not want to be seen completely disfigured. According to another version, Magritte was fond of the then-famous Fantomas. No one knew who was hiding behind a mask.

The artist chose not to depict faces in order to show the blindness of love. Lovers are so passionate about their feelings and each other that they simply do not notice anything around.

We see a woman and a man at the moment of passion. This can be understood by the characteristic folds of tissue. Passion just blinded them. They cannot think correctly and notice something. The artist completely shook the fabric of their heads. The metaphor that people lose their heads from love is fully realized here.

Another interpretation is also possible. This deep feeling is enough in itself. His vision is simply unnecessary. Lovers may not see anything, since they absolutely do not need it. They feel intimacy even through two layers of tissue. For a real sense of barriers simply does not exist.

Magritte portrayed the lovers in the room. This can be judged by the background. If a person is in love, his inner vision opens. He begins to feel the world really deeply. No obstacles can prevent lovers.

Magritte wanted the viewer to think.





Grabar Pictures

Watch the video: Why Magritte Matters (December 2020).